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 Quotes from books about daycare - 2005-2006, p4

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Featured Books 2005-2006:  
Motherhood - how should we care for our children? pages:  1  | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

Raising Babies: Should under 3s go to nursery?

pages:  7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13
Family Building - The Five Fundamentals of Effective Parenting pages:  6 Women Who Make the World Worse pages:  14
Freakonomics - A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything pages:  6 The Cultural Devastation of American Women pages:  15
Books from: 1970  |  1980-1984  |  1985-1989 |  1990-1994  |  1995-1999  |  2000-2002  |  2003-2004  | 2005-2006 | 2007-2008 | 2009-2010 |

Book

Quote/Comment

Motherhood - how should we care for our children?  by Anne Manne, 2005,  p. 286 ...the crche decided to film the activities of the children over a day, and then speed up the film for the parents' entertainment. As the daily routine of the children unfolded on film, the initial amusement of the parents was replaced by a deathly silence.
...it was a shock to view the stark evidence of the regimentation, rigid conformity and institutionalized nature of their children's childcare experience.
Category = Quality
Motherhood - how should we care for our children?  by Anne Manne, 2005,  p. 287 Childcare provided by the marketplace is an organisational system with an inbuilt economic logic. Rather than seventy-five or so mothers looking after one, two or three children each, McChildcare depends on a very much reduced core of adults taking care of fifty or a hundred children. Instead of one mother looking after one baby (humans are not usually born in litters), one caregiver looks after five. Similar economies of scale occur as children move through toddler and preschool years. The amount of time and energy, the number of adults it takes to raise a child, childhood itself, is being rationalised*.
*rationalised - Here this could mean, "rationed"
Category = Economics, Quality
Motherhood - how should we care for our children?  by Anne Manne, 2005,  p. 287

McChildcare is more efficient and cost-effective, its economy of scale replacing costly, time-inefficient parental care by a commodity service. Just as the continued existence of McDonald's* as a profitable enterprise requires a large quantity of hamburgers to be produced at the lowest possible cost, so too McChildcare takes on the largest number of children it can get away with--a veritable production line of early childhoods at the lowest possible cost.
*McDonalds = the famous fast food restaurant chain
Category = Economics, Quality

Motherhood - how should we care for our children?  by Anne Manne, 2005,  p. 287 (Noted British child expert) Penelope Leach has pointed out:
The more economy of scale a daycare institution offers, the worse the care will be for the children...childcare is so labour-intensive that any increase in salaries has a marked effect on total costs--and rapidly reverses economies of scale. Daycare centres are always expensive to run and the better they are the more they cost.
Category = Economics, Quality
Motherhood - how should we care for our children?  by Anne Manne, 2005,  p. 288

While the impersonality of mass institutional care is not restricted to the large for-profit childcare chains, it is most vividly seen there. Queensland (Australia) businessman Eddy Groves presides over 'an aggressively expanding empire of childcare centres'. Groves's personal wealth, estimated in October 2004 at $175 million, was primarily made from childcare. Around 50 per cent of ABC Learning's income comes from taxpayer-provided funds via the Child Care Benefit.
Category = Economics, Quality

Motherhood - how should we care for our children?  by Anne Manne, 2005,  p. 288-289 Moreover one article which quoted Groves noted that if there is one threat to profitability (of his ABC Learning daycare business empire) it is the prospect of improving wages and conditions for staff!
In some instances, industry representatives explicitly opposed paid maternity leave. With almost entirely female labour, such paid leave was something to fear.

Category = Economics, Quality
Motherhood - how should we care for our children?  by Anne Manne, 2005,  p. 290 In one survey of New South Wales (Australia) childcare students, every single trainee said they would never place their own child in childcare after what they had seen.
Category = Danger, Quality
Motherhood - how should we care for our children?  by Anne Manne, 2005,  p. 291 The principle of efficiency at the centre of the McDonaldisation of childcare leaves other fingerprints. Some US childcare centres have drive-by windows so that busy parents, as at McDonalds, don't have to get out of the car to drop off children or pick them up.
Category = Quality

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 Quotes from books about daycare - 2005-2006, p4

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Last updated:  02/27/2008

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