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 Quotes from books about daycare - 2005-2006, p10

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Featured Books 2005-2006:  
Motherhood - how should we care for our children? pages:  1  | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

Raising Babies: Should under 3s go to nursery?

pages:  7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13
Family Building - The Five Fundamentals of Effective Parenting pages:  6 Women Who Make the World Worse pages:  14
Freakonomics - A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything pages:  6 The Cultural Devastation of American Women pages:  15
Books from: 1970  |  1980-1984  |  1985-1989 |  1990-1994  |  1995-1999  |  2000-2002  |  2003-2004  | 2005-2006 | 2007-2008 | 2009-2010 |

Book

Quote/Comment

Raising Babies: Should under 3s go to nursery?
by Steve Biddulph,
2005,  p.52-53
(The daycare debate) got very nasty, as disputes in academia tend to do. Research projects that did not meet the needs of the prevailing (pro-nursery care) ideology were suppressed or abandoned.
...This division among experts was reflected in wider society. The infamous 'Mummy Wars' indicated a major philosophical clash of values that split the culture.
Category = History, Politics
Raising Babies: Should under 3s go to nursery?
by Steve Biddulph,
2005,  p.54
Even the most ardent advocates of nursery care have remained critical of the poor standard and unresourced nature of many centres. Quality care became the catch phrase. 'If it is good quality, it will be alright -- in fact it will be better than you can give at home.' This was the state of play by about 1995, and few dared to say otherwise. Yet this was about to come tumbling down.
Category =History, Quality
Raising Babies: Should under 3s go to nursery?
by Steve Biddulph,
2005,  p.59-66
These three (large long-term) studies* along with others in countries ranging from Australia to Norway...have led to a considerable change of viewpoint among those who felt that nursery care was at worst harmless, and at best a positive thing for children under three years of age.
Here, in summary, is what was found across all three studies:

-Yes, there is some damage
-The quality of care doesn't prevent the damage
-Less is better, but there is no safe threshold
-Timing is crucial
-The damage is moderate but widespread

If anything, the studies may well underestimate the damaging effects.
*Studies:
1 ) NICHD - US's National Institute of Child Health and Development study

2)  EPPE - UK's Effective Provision of Pre-School Education study
3)  British Child Development Expert Penelope Leach's study

Category = Behavior, Development, History, Quality

Raising Babies: Should under 3s go to nursery?
by Steve Biddulph,
2005,  p.68-69
Meanwhile, the studies reported above are now being replicated or improved on in other places worldwide. Studies in Italy, Sweden, Norway, Australia and Bermuda have all reported similar problems of early nursery care being linked to behaviour problems, and to problems in bonding with parents.
Category =Behavior
Raising Babies: Should under 3s go to nursery?
by Steve Biddulph,
2005,  p.74
"...To improve the responsiveness of group care requires maintaining very high staff-infant ratios and keeping staff turnover down to an absolute minimum. Both are very expensive."
In fact, it is almost impossible. Turnover of nursery staff is running at 30-40 per cent, caused by low pay, poor training and low status. Britain spends only 0.3 per cent of GDP* on early years provision, compared with 2 per cent by Sweden. In other words, a six-fold increase in expenditure would be needed to achieve a standard which Swedish parents have decided still isn't good enough.

*GDP = Gross Domestic Product
Category = Economics, Quality

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 Quotes from books about daycare - 2005-2006, p10

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Last updated:  02/27/2008

Books:  1970 | 1980-1984 | 1985-1989 | 1990-1994 | 1995-1999 | 2000-2002 | 2003-2004 | 2005-2006 | 2007-2008 | 2009-2010


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