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 Quotes from books about daycare - 2000-2002, p3

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Featured Books 2000-2002:  
The Irreducible Needs of Children pages:  1  (bottom) | 2 | 3 | 4 What's wrong with Daycare? pages:  15
Parenthood by Proxy pages:  4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 The Broken Hearth pages:  15
There's No Place Like Work pages:  9 | 10 | 11 Bringing up Boys pages:  15
The Four-Thirds Solution pages:  12  (bottom)  | 13 | 14 Bias: A CBS Insider Exposes How the Media Distort the News pages:  15
Books from: 1970  |  1980-1984  |  1985-1989 |  1990-1994  |  1995-1999  |  2000-2002  |  2003-2004  |  2005-2006 | 2007-2008 | 2009-2010 |

Book

Quote/Comment

The Irreducible Needs of Children by T. Berry Brazelton, M.D. and Stanley I. Greenspan, M.D., 2000, page 25 In a number of day-care centers, when the children are mobile, I see a lot of emotionally hungry children.  Children come up to any new adult and hang on.  Some of that reaching out for any mother is simply reaching out to anyone who will give them some attention.  It's a little indiscriminate.  We see that in institutions such as orphanages where there is emotional deprivation.  A minute here and there of reciprocal interaction, sometimes around feeding or diapering, is not enough to provide the needed security and sense of being cared for.  -- Stanley Greenspan, M.D.
Category = Behavior
 The Irreducible Needs of Children by T. Berry Brazelton, M.D. and Stanley I. Greenspan, M.D., 2000, page 26 In day care, by design, the caregivers change each year.  Turnover is so great, though, that...there may be three changes of caregivers by the time a baby has had a year of day care.  -- Stanley Greenspan, M.D.
Category = Quality
The Irreducible Needs of Children by T. Berry Brazelton, M.D. and Stanley I. Greenspan, M.D., 2000, page 26 The caregiver in a day-care setting is not like a meta peleth* in a kibbutz (an ideal daycare situation) in Israel, who is a stable person in a child's life, with him for four or five years.  -- Stanley Greenspan, M.D.
* nursemaid, day nurse
source:  the New Bantam Megiddo Hebrew & English Dictionary. 
Category = Quality
The Irreducible Needs of Children by T. Berry Brazelton, M.D. and Stanley I. Greenspan, M.D., 2000, page 27 To improve day care, I see three babies per adult as the absolute maximum for the first year of life.  But now the norm is four babies per caregiver.  Imagine a mother with triplets and how hard it is for her to care for all three babies at the same time.
-- T. Berry Brazelton, M.D.

Category = Quality
The Irreducible Needs of Children by T. Berry Brazelton, M.D. and Stanley I. Greenspan, M.D., 2000, page 41 Becoming dependent on primary caregivers who disappear does not breed in a baby an inner sense of security and consistency.  Child care arrangements where children are spending most of their day with transient caregivers should not be viewed as optimal or chosen by design. 
Category = Quality
The Irreducible Needs of Children by T. Berry Brazelton, M.D. and Stanley I. Greenspan, M.D., 2000, page 46 Since it is so hard for caregivers to have long, nurturing interactions when caring for four or more babies (standard in most institutional day care), and because of the staff turnover that is characteristic of most institutional day-care settings, as well as the tendency to have staff change each year as children move from the infant room to the toddler room to the preschool room, we believe that in the first two years of life full-time daycare is a difficult context in which to provide the ongoing, nurturing care by one or a few caregivers that the child requires. 
Category = Quality

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 Quotes from books about daycare - 2000-2002, p3

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Last updated:  02/27/2008

Books:  1970 | 1980-1984 | 1985-1989 | 1990-1994 | 1995-1999 | 2000-2002 | 2003-2004 | 2005-2006 | 2007-2008 | 2009-2010


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