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 Quotes from books about daycare - 2000-2002, p2

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Featured Books 2000-2002:  
The Irreducible Needs of Children pages:  1  (bottom) | 2 | 3 | 4 What's wrong with Daycare? pages:  15
Parenthood by Proxy pages:  4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 The Broken Hearth pages:  15
There's No Place Like Work pages:  9 | 10 | 11 Bringing up Boys pages:  15
The Four-Thirds Solution pages:  12  (bottom)  | 13 | 14 Bias: A CBS Insider Exposes How the Media Distort the News pages:  15
Books from: 1970  |  1980-1984  |  1985-1989 |  1990-1994  |  1995-1999  |  2000-2002  |  2003-2004  |  2005-2006 | 2007-2008 | 2009-2010 |

Book

Quote/Comment

The Irreducible Needs of Children   by T. Berry Brazelton, M.D. and Stanley I. Greenspan, M.D., 2000 Introduction, pg. xii The day care debate gets confused however by focusing only on research reports that maintain it's the quality of care that counts, not whether children are in institutional day care or family day care or cared for by parents...But what tends to get obscured in these academic discussions is the fact that at present most non-parental care (as revealed in a number of studies, including the study that documented that quality counts) is not of high quality.
Category = Quality
The Irreducible Needs of Children by T. Berry Brazelton, M.D. and Stanley I. Greenspan, M.D., 2000 Introduction, pg. xiii With over half the nation's children receiving one form or another of non-parental care, the question is whether we want to allow a type of care that is not providing children the needed nurturance and social and intellectual interaction.  We have to ask whether this nurturance is possible in settings where caregivers are caring for four or more babies (and later six or more toddlers), and are paid minimal wage, and given little training and little incentive to avoid staff turnover.
Category = Quality
The Irreducible Needs of Children  by T. Berry Brazelton, M.D. and Stanley I. Greenspan, M.D., 2000 Introduction, pg. xv This (day-care) is "institutional love."  It is provided at either end of the life-span for both the poor and the well-to-do, for those who, because of their age and helplessness, need to depend on others for their care.  We all know what this kind of care is like.  What we don't want to think about is that this care is what we are providing for those we love.
Category = Quality
The Irreducible Needs of Children  by T. Berry Brazelton, M.D. and Stanley I. Greenspan, M.D., 2000, page 8 The notion that relationships are essential for regulating our behavior and moods and feelings as well as for intellectual development is one that needs greater emphasis as we think about the kinds of settings and priorities we want for our children.   The interactions that are necessary can take place in full measure only with a loving caregiver who has lots of time to devote to a child.  A busy day-care provider with four babies or six or eight toddlers usually won't have the time for these long sequences of interaction.
Category = Behavior, Development, Quality
The Irreducible Needs of Children by T. Berry Brazelton, M.D. and Stanley I. Greenspan, M.D., 2000,  page 24 If parents have options and are able to provide high-quality care themselves, I find it best not to have infants or toddlers in full-time 30-40 plus-hour-a-week day care.  Current research and my own clinical observations suggest that most day-care centers do not provide high-quality care.  The quality of interaction between caregivers and babies is often less than optimal.  Also, the current ratios of four babies per caregiver in the first year and six in the second year, coupled with high staff turnover, minimum wages, insufficient training, and the expectable change of caregivers each year, make it difficult to provide high-quality, ongoing, nurturing care in those early years. -- Stanley Greenspan, M.D.
Category = Quality

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 Quotes from books about daycare - 2000-2002, p2

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Last updated:  02/27/2008

Books:  1970 | 1980-1984 | 1985-1989 | 1990-1994 | 1995-1999 | 2000-2002 | 2003-2004 | 2005-2006 | 2007-2008 | 2009-2010


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