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Quotes from books about daycare - 1980-1984, p5

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Featured Books 1980-1984:  
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Books from: 1970  |  1980-1984  |  1985-1989 |  1990-1994  |  1995-1999  |  2000-2002  |  2003-2004  | 2005-2006 | 2007-2008 | 2009-2010 |

Book

Quote/Comment

The Day Care Decision
What's Best for You and Your Child
by William & Wendy Dreskin,
1983,  p 40
Although young children are not very articulate, they often do express their unhappiness about being in day care, in a variety of ways. This is an important kind of information, which is usually suppressed or downplayed by day care providers. When a day care worker from Pennsylvania started work at a center, she noticed that three-and-a-half-year-old Eric would frequently walk off into a corner of the room crying and asking for his mommy. She asked the director if it was the policy to tell parents if a child complained about being at the center. The director replied, "Sometimes it's hard for children to adjust. But we don't tell the parents about it. It makes them feel guilty."
Category =  Caregiver, Politics
The Day Care Decision
What's Best for You and Your Child
by William & Wendy Dreskin,
1983,  p 40
If, in spite of this censorship, parents become aware of the fact that their children are unhappy in day care, they usually assume that it is the fault of the particular...day care center (not the institution of daycare itself). Day care providers know this all too well, and they naturally want to avoid friction, criticism, confrontations, and possible bad will and loss of business. Not relaying these youngsters' distress calls is the easiest path.
Unwittingly, parents may contribute to this vicious circle by assuming that any complaints that they hear mean that the current day care arrangement is not satisfactory and must be replaced by a better day care arrangement.
The net result of all this is that the message that day care itself is causing a problem rarely gets through.
Category =  Caregiver, Politics
The Day Care Decision
What's Best for You and Your Child
by William & Wendy Dreskin,
1983,  p 41
(As day care providers ourselves) It took some time for us to realize that the children often were unhappy and missed their parents despite our doing a good job of meeting their individual needs and keeping them actively involved in projects and activities throughout the long day. There is a natural tendency for conscientious day care workers to define their job as keeping the children happy. They know that parents expect this. A day care worker who does express concerns to to a parent may be seen as a traitor by the other workers. The other workers often feel that the concerned worker is in effect telling the parent that they are not doing a good job. so there is strong peer pressure not to speak out or question the underlying assumption that "the kids are okay."
Category =  Caregiver, Politics

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Quotes from books about daycare - 1980-1984, p5

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Last updated:  02/27/2008

Books:  1970 | 1980-1984 | 1985-1989 | 1990-1994 | 1995-1999 | 2000-2002 | 2003-2004 | 2005-2006 | 2007-2008 | 2009-2010


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