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Quotes from web articles about daycare - 2000, p2

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Reference

Quote

Flashback by Bill Kauffman
Mother Jones, Anti-Feminist, The American Enterprise Online
taemag.com,

June 2000

 

Mother Jones (Irish-born Mary Harris Jones [1830-1930], the famous and notorious activist), disdained the rich not least because they hired others to care for their children:  "The rich woman who has a maid to raise her child can't expect to get the right viewpoint of life," she wrote in Miners Magazine.  "If they would raise their own babies, their hearts would open and their feelings would become human.  And the effect on the child is just as bad.  A nurse can't give her mother's love to somebody else's child."
Mother Jones detested the middle-class reformers who sought to transfer household functions to the market or the state.  She suspected that capitalists were scheming to force women into the paid labor force and children into daycare; the prospect did not please her:  "The human being is the only animal which is neglected in its babyhood.  The brute (dumb animal) mother suckles and preserves her young at the cost of her own life, if need be.  The human mother hires another, poorer woman for the job."
Category = History,  Politics
Day Care Debate:
More than Aggressive Babies
by Cecil E. Maranville,
ucg.org, June 2000
A study released by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) in late April found that children who spend more than 30 hours a week in day care at an early age tend to be more aggressive, especially toward their peers. The study also found that these children were more fearful, shy and sad.
(The U.S. national average for the amount of time spent by a child in day care is 26 hours per week.)
...Jay Belsky, lead researcher on the NICHD study said that the children "scored higher on items like 'gets in lots of fights,' 'cruelty,' 'explosive behavior,' as well as 'talking too much,' 'argues a lot,' and 'demands a lot of attention'" ("Day Care Linked to Aggression in Kids," April 19, 2001, AP).
Category = Behavior
Day Care Debate:
More than Aggressive Babies
by Cecil E. Maranville,
ucg.org, June 2000
A further defense of day care is the claim that it has academic benefits.
..."Academic skills"-of preschoolers? Have we lost sight of reality?
In her April 25th piece, syndicated columnist Kathleen Parker offers this pointed rebuttal: "In other words, if your child is lucky enough to find himself in high-quality child care, he'll do better on his first-grade SATs*. Yippee."
*SAT = (formerly called the) Scholastic Aptitude Test or Scholastic Achievement Test.  SATs are standardized tests taken by high school students that are used by colleges and universities in the United States to aid in selection of incoming freshmen.
Category = Politics
Day Care Debate:
More than Aggressive Babies
by Cecil E. Maranville,
ucg.org, June 2000
Parents are reacting emotionally to any criticism of day care. Some parents don't want their lifestyle interfered with; others don't want their livelihood taken away. None want to be made to feel guilty.
Category = Politics 

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