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Quotes from web articles about daycare, 2007, p1

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Reference

Quote

Daycare believers
by Oliver James, from The Guardian's "Comment is Free" blog, http://commentisfree.guardian.co.uk,
30-Jan-2007


 

In fact, if you apply the scientific evidence the absurdities of substitute care as a social policy soon emerge. Under-threes need one-on-one from the same person or a close relative every day. If ... substitute care was being done with mental health in mind, you would create a national nanny network. In many cases, this would consist of single mums leaving their babies or toddlers to go to the home of another single mum or toddler to be paid to care for it. In some cases, two single mums would simply be being paid to care for each other's little children - completely barking*, on every level.
Barking
= British slang for "crazy" (Abbreviated from "barking mad")
Category = Economics

Daycare believers
by Oliver James, from The Guardian's "Comment is Free" blog, http://commentisfree.guardian.co.uk,
30-Jan-2007
Having spent a week observing what is probably the best nursery in the world in Copenhagen*, I am sure that daycare is a lousy option.
*Denmark - A Scandinavian country noted for its high quality day care.

Category = Quality
Study ties day care to behavior problems
MSNBC.com
March 27, 2007
The more time that kids spent in day care, the more likely their sixth-grade teachers were to report problem behaviors such as getting in fights, being disobedient in school and arguing a lot, according to the largest study of child care and development ever conducted in the United States.
Category = Behavior
Daycare: Breeding Ground for Behavioral Problems
by Cal Thomas, syndicated columnist
www.crosswalk.com
March 28, 2007
A new study that followed children from birth until age 12 has found that those children who spend large amounts of time in child-care centers exhibit more behavior problems – such as aggression and disobedience – than other children. The study is in the latest issue of the journal "child development".
...Children cannot be micro-waved. Like gourmet meals, they must be lovingly prepared for life with the right ingredients and the proper amount of time invested in them. That’s just a fact and this study is one of many, along with common sense, that proved it.
Category = Behavior
The Perennial Child Care Crisis
by Janice Shaw Crouse
www.cwfa.org
29-Aug-2007
The child care issue is a perennial one; if it is August you can count on a press conference complete with a flurry of articles citing a poll or two lamenting the cost of child care, praising Head Start, and demanding increased federal funding for both. Inevitably, there is a child care crisis just as Congress is debating budgets and a new school year is just around the corner.
Category = Economics, Politics
The Perennial Child Care Crisis
by Janice Shaw Crouse
www.cwfa.org
29-Aug-2007
We do have to invest in the future by finding ways to reach children who are at risk, but pouring money into corruption-ridden programs like federally-funded day care and the Head Start program is certainly counterproductive.
Category = Economics, Politics
Child Care: Who Benefits?
by Jennifer Buckingham
Centre for Independent Studies,
Executive Summary No. 89, p. 1-3
www.cis.org.au
24-Oct-2007
Much research has focused on the quality of child care and has concluded, unsurprisingly, that high-quality child care is better than low-quality child care, but has not shown that any quality of child care is superior to parental care.

Over time, child care has gone from something that families would use sparingly and only if necessary, to being an alleged human right. There is a loud chorus calling for increased public funding so that all children can attend ‘high-quality’ child care. The major parties have largely acquiesced, to the point that it is estimated that the (Australian) Federal government now provides more than half of the cost of child care for most families.
Category = Economics, Politics, Quality
Child Care: Who Benefits?
by Jennifer Buckingham
Centre for Independent Studies,
Executive Summary No. 89, p. 5
www.cis.org.au
24-Oct-2007
It is not the intention of this paper to reignite the ‘child care wars’ of the 1990s...
The biggest mistake made in the reporting of research on child care is to confound centre-based care for infants with part-time pre-school programmes for 3 and 4 year olds.
They are very different forms of non-parental care and have very different effects.
Category = Behavior, Development, Quality
Child Care: Who Benefits?
by Jennifer Buckingham
Centre for Independent Studies,
Executive Summary No. 89, p. 5
www.cis.org.au
24-Oct-2007
The studies most commonly cited as providing evidence of the efficacy of formal child care are American. Perhaps the best known of these is the High Scope Perry Preschool Project, a longitudinal study that has followed its subjects from early childhood into their forties. The Perry Preschool Project is responsible for the oft-repeated claim of a seven-fold return on investment in early childhood care programmes (read, ‘centre-based child care with highly trained staff ’), and dramatically-reduced risk of unemployment, criminality and teenage pregnancy.
The results as stated are not false but they do not apply as broadly as might be assumed from the way they are generally reported. The Perry Preschool Project was a programme designed for children aged 3 and 4 years, from severely disadvantaged families, and who had been identified as being at risk of developmental delays. The project involved part-day pre-school attendance and home visits by child care professionals.
This means that although the results are striking and significant, they do not necessarily apply to children under 3 years, or to children with a wider range of backgrounds and abilities. They also do not apply to long day-care.
This is a common misrepresentation. Other American studies regularly cited to support the argument that child care is widely beneficial include the Abecedarian Project, Project CARE, Head Start and Early Head Start. Each of these studies involved children from low-income or disadvantaged families. Each of these studies, moreover, involved a combination of centre-based child care and home visits with, in some cases, health and
parenting services. Again, the results achieved cannot be expected to be replicated with the general population.
Category = Behavior, Development, Quality

 

 

 

Quotes from web articles about daycare, 2007, p1

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