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Quotes from News articles about daycare: 2004, p3

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Nursery Tales by Madeleine Bunting, The Guardian, 8-Jul-04 (Child development expert Penelope Leach) chooses her battles carefully, but she believes the day nursery (daycare) debate is one she now has to get into. Since 1998, she has been co-director of the largest ever UK study of childcare from birth to school age, Families, Children and Child Care (FCCC).
...initial findings fit with those from other studies in the US and the UK: "It is fairly clear from data from different parts of the world that the less time children spend in group care before three years, the better. Infants spending as little as 12 hours a week in day nurseries - this is such a low threshold that it covers almost all infants in this childcare setting - showed slightly lower levels of social development and emotional regulation (less enthusiastic cooperation, concentration, social engagement and initiative) as toddlers.
Category = Behavior, Development
Nursery Tales by Madeleine Bunting, The Guardian, 8-Jul-04 The tendency of government policy for more day-nursery (daycare) provision to the exclusion of other types of childcare is extremely short-sighted; it's easier for an infant to catch up on cognitive skills later on, but they can't catch up on insecure attachment. The trend towards more day nurseries is out of kilter with what the research is finding.
Category = Politics
Nursery Tales by Madeleine Bunting, The Guardian, 8-Jul-04 We know from research that staff in nurseries (day-cares) tend to be firstly, more detached - less sensitive and responsive - towards the children and there is more "flatness of affect", a subtle but very important characteristic which means that there is no differentiation in response to a child, a sort of blandness.
Category = Quality
Nursery Tales by Madeleine Bunting, The Guardian, 8-Jul-04 The two biggest longitudinal* studies in the world on the impact of childcare on infants have come to strikingly similar conclusions. In America, the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) published conclusions last summer that were remarkably similar to those of the UK study, the Effective Provision of Pre-school Education (EPPE). Both make for uncomfortable reading.
...The EPPE study focused predominantly on the impact of pre-school education on three- and four-year-olds.
...buried in the small print it (the EPPE study) acknowledged that "high levels of group care before the age of three (and particularly before the age of two) were associated with higher levels of anti-social behaviour at age three"
*Longitudinal = Over a long period of time
Category = Behavior

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Quotes from News articles about daycare: 2004, p3

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Last updated:  03/08/2008

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