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Quotes from web articles about daycare: 1998, p3

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Reference

Quote
Emptying the Nest: 
The Clinton Child Care Agenda by Charmaine Crouse Yoest, Family Research Council, frc.org, 1998,
pg. 8
Daycare advocates believe that more federal subsidies will help ensure quality care for children in child care centers.  However, some of the concerns over quality in day care are challenges that may be resistant to monetary solutions.
Category = Politics, Quality
Emptying the Nest: 
The Clinton Child Care Agenda by Charmaine Crouse Yoest, Family Research Council, frc.org, 1998,
pg. 8
There is no doubt, and no disagreement, over the current level of quality among day care centers.  It is abysmal.
Category = Quality
Emptying the Nest: 
The Clinton Child Care Agenda by Charmaine Crouse Yoest, Family Research Council, frc.org, 1998,
 pg. 9
There is also consensus that high turnover is a huge challenge for the child care industry.  A study done in 1990 found that average teacher turnover in child care centers nationwide was 50 percent.  In for-profit chain day care centers, this average shot up to 77 percent.
Category = Quality
Emptying the Nest: 
The Clinton Child Care Agenda by Charmaine Crouse Yoest, Family Research Council, frc.org, 1998,
pg. 9-10
With large numbers of children being cared for together, day care brings with in another inherent problem -- exposure to infections and disease.  This is a particularly difficult problem for the industry to address for two reasons.  First, a child's immune system is not fully developed until he is at least five or six.  A child of this age is more susceptible to infections, making it more difficult to control the spread of illness once any child in the center becomes sick.  In addition to some of the more obvious reasons why children more easily spread germs, research shows that some highly infectious children may be asymptomatic, other infections are transmitted before the onset of symptoms, and small children put their hands in their mouths every one to three minutes!
Second, (the daycare's) environment is an efficient transmitter of germs.
...
Not surprisingly, then, children in day care get sick.  A lot.  In fact, children in day care are 18 times more likely to become ill, and, at any one time, 16 percent of children attending a day care center are sick.  Of these sick children, 82 percent still attend their day care (and transmit disease that infects everyone else).
Category = Disease

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Quotes from web articles about daycare: 1998, p3

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Last updated:  04/30/2008

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