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Quotes from News articles about daycare: 2006, p2

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Surely We Can Emancipate Women, and Not Abandon Children to Indifferent Care? by Steve Biddulph, The Guardian, 18-Feb-06 And then there's the babies (in daycare), lying in rows of cots, then milling about in garish rooms through their toddler years, aching for one special adult to love them. 12,000 hours of this before they set foot in school.
Category = Quality
 
Surely We Can Emancipate Women, and Not Abandon Children to Indifferent Care? by Steve Biddulph, The Guardian, 18-Feb-06 ...almost a quarter of a million British children under three attend a day nursery full- or part-time. Daycare was originally intended for three- and four-year-olds, but its use has spread downwards; sometimes babies are now put into nurseries when they are just days old. The hours have got longer too: throughout the industrialised world, millions of children under three are there for 10 hours a day, five days a week. This large-scale group care of the very young is a recent thing. It has happened without prior research or understanding (compared with, for instance, the invention of kindergarten, which was designed with child development needs in mind).
Category = Economics, Quality
Surely We Can Emancipate Women, and Not Abandon Children to Indifferent Care? by Steve Biddulph, The Guardian, 18-Feb-06 Day nurseries (daycares) are an attempt - whether motivated by idealism or corporate greed - to slot messy and needy young children into the new economic system, while at the same time reassuring us that it is good for them, socially and educationally. Nurseries are marketed so well that parents at home have even begun to feel that they are not as good for their babies and toddlers as "professionals" might be, despite the fact that these "professionals" may well be teenagers with minimal qualifications, who fell into this line of work by default. The critical, rarely mentioned core of nursery care is that our children will be looked after in bulk..., compared to 1:1 at home. Like McDonald's fast food, we can enjoy the convenience of drive-through, ready-made, fast-parenting; through the miracle of mass production. The rapid adoption of nursery care in the early years has been a huge social experiment; essentially a gamble taken by millions of parents that "everything will be OK". The (negative) results of that experiment are now emerging.
Category = Economics, Politics, Quality
Surely We Can Emancipate Women, and Not Abandon Children to Indifferent Care? by Steve Biddulph, The Guardian, 18-Feb-06 In the US, Britain and half a dozen other countries, very large long-term studies, bringing together teams of leading experts, were set in motion to try and establish the truth once and for all. Was nursery care harmful?
In the NICHD 2004 results, three times as many children - 17% - had noticeable behaviour problems in the over-30 daycare hours a week group, while only 6% had these problems in the under-10 hours a week cohort. According to the researchers' report, these problems included "disobedience, being defiant, talking back to staff, getting into fights, showing cruelty, bullying or meanness to others, physically attacking other people, being explosive and showing unpredictable behaviour".
The Leach study reported babies and toddlers in daycare to have "higher levels of aggression", and to be "more inclined to become withdrawn, compliant and sad". It concluded: "The social and emotional development of children cared for by someone other than their mothers is definitely less good."
Category = Behavior
Surely We Can Emancipate Women, and Not Abandon Children to Indifferent Care? by Steve Biddulph, The Guardian, 18-Feb-06 The mantra of the 90s had been that poor outcomes were due to poor-quality nurseries. The new studies seemed to indicate something that loving parents gave in one-to-one care that could not be substituted. Quality care was not the panacea that had been hoped for: it was still "stranger care", and in a group rather than individual setting, and this mattered to the proper development of secure and non-aggressive children.
Quality time was a lie. Hurry was the enemy of love.
Category = Quality
Surely We Can Emancipate Women, and Not Abandon Children to Indifferent Care? by Steve Biddulph, The Guardian, 18-Feb-06 The more nursery care a child receives, the more the effects received, in a proportional amount. The researchers refer to this as a dose-related effect, and it is a strong pointer to a causal link. There isn't a safe level of nursery care usage for the under-threes (but at the same time, a little is better than a lot).
Category = Quality

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Quotes from News articles about daycare: 2006, p2

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Last updated:  03/08/2008

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