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 Quotes from magazines about daycare - 2000, p3

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Quote

Concerns about Child Care-Part 2
by BILL MUEHLENBERG , National Observer (Australia), 22-Sep-03
This raises the question of equity. Why should mothers who choose to stay at home with their young children receive little or no financial support, while mothers who put their children into formal day care and return to the paid work force get various benefits, subsidies and financial assistance for doing so?
...Why this discrimination? Governments should not be in the business of showing partiality to one kind of mother over another. It should treat all of them fairly. This is not a call for special favours or rights for stay at home mothers, simply equity and fairness.
Category = Politics
Concerns about Child Care-Part 2
by BILL MUEHLENBERG , National Observer (Australia), 22-Sep-03
One Stanford University psychologist has remarked that with the mass exodus of children into day care, "we are altering the cultural fabric" of society.
Category = Politics
Daycare Doesn't Reduce Poverty,British Medical Journal
Oct 20, 2003
A new study shows providing daycare for the children of poor mothers may not improve their financial situation.
Category = Economics
Daycare Doesn't Reduce Poverty, British Medical Journal, Oct 20, 2003 Researchers in London studied 120 mothers and more than 140 children.  The children were assigned to an intervention group or a control group.  Those in the intervention group were provided with a high quality daycare facility, while those in the control group attended other facilities chosen by their parents.
...the intervention group children were more likely to develop ear infections in one or both ears and were more likely to visit a health care professional for a medical concern.
Category =  Disease
Daycare Doesn't Reduce Poverty, British Medical Journal, Oct 20, 2003 ...Researchers say although more women in the intervention group found paying jobs, offering childcare did not seem to increase household income.
Category = Economics
Introduction, p.v., /Brian Robertson, Family Policy Review, Volume 1, Number 2, Fall 2003 (The Child-Care 'Crisis' and Its Remedies) We do not share this vision of society that regards a professional class of day-care workers as adequate replacements for parents and an institutional setting as just as desirable an environment for children as the home setting of the natural family.
Category = Quality
"The Fractured Dream of Social Parenting" by Allan C. Carlson, page 19-20, Family Policy Review, Volume 1, Number 2, Fall 2003 (The Child-Care 'Crisis' and Its Remedies) ...day care proves in practice to rest on class exploitation.
...a large art of the modern American child-care regime involves wealthy two-income families using tax subsidies to place their children in child-care centers staffed by low-wage female workers.
...twenty-first-century American child-care workers are commonly the poorest of the poor...
Category = Economics
"The Fractured Dream of Social Parenting" by Allan C. Carlson, page 19, Family Policy Review, Volume 1, Number 2, Fall 2003 (The Child-Care 'Crisis' and Its Remedies)
 
...the risks posed to infant and child health by day care are not going away. True, massive regimens of antibiotics for all the children involved make the short-term situation often tolerable. But children in day care still are at nearly 100-percent-greater risk for contracting life-threatening diseases such as hemophilus influenza and meningitis. They are four-and-a-half times more likely than home-cared children to contract infections and nearly three times as likely to need hospitalization. Day care children are significantly more at risk of contracting upper respiratory tract infections, gastrointestinal disorders, ear infections, salmonella, herpes simplex, rubella, hepatitus (sic) A & B, scabies, dwarf tapeworm, pinworms, and diarrhea. And antibiotics are a fading asset; virulent new strains of disease resistant to these drugs now find their way into the centers.
Category = Disease

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Last updated:  07/03/2011

Magazine Articles from:  1970 | 1980 | 1990 | 2000

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